Tasmania

Regardless of it’s small size, the state of Tasmania boasts hundreds of dive sites along our 5,400 kilometres (2,796 miles) of coastline, and experiences for both beginners and advanced divers. At Tinderbox in Tasmania’s south, you can follow underwater trails which are ideal for snorkelers and first-time divers.
The Tasman Peninsula offers spectacular dive sites, ranging from vast kelp forests through to brilliant caves and canyons at Waterfall Bay. More experienced divers will enjoy the Hippolyte Rock site where you can dive amongst a colony of Australian Fur Seals, although depth and strong currents do limit this area to divers with extensive experience.
One of Tasmania’s prime sites is the Troy D, a 55 metre (181 foot) former Hopper Barge, an artificial reef, scuttled off the north-west tip of Maria Island on Tasmania’s east coast. It’s a 15 minute boat ride to the Troy D, located four kilometers south west of Maria Island in the Mercury Passage. There is full access to every compartment of the Troy D, offering fascinating diving opportunities to explore the engine room and other areas.
Maria Island has been recognised as having one of the highest marine biodiversity counts in Australia which is why this location is so ideal for an artificial reef. This coastline also boasts the highly popular dive sites off Bicheno including Paradise Reef with its plentiful sea whips and finger sponges as well as the Golden Bommies, a most rewarding deeper dive.
This coastline also boasts the highly popular dive sites off Bicheno including Paradise Reef with its plentiful sea whips and finger sponges in addition to the Golden Bommies, a most rewarding deeper dive.

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